New ZAP team members visit Chora

by Irma Havlicek
Web Content Producer

The Zagora Archaeological Project (ZAP) directors provide excursions to team members so that they get as much of an introduction to the island of Andros as is possible in the time available.

ZAP team members who visited Chora on Sunday 19 October 2014
ZAP team members who visited Chora on Sunday 19 October 2014. From left, starting at the top: Maria Karagiannopoulou, Megan Sheppard Brennan, Aspasia Efstathiou, Marco Schugt, Valeria de Scarpis, Roza Beshara, Francesca McMaster and Susan Wrigley. © AAIA; photo by Annette Dukes.

This can be tricky because team members work six days a week and because there are limited vehicles available for all the project’s transport needs. Vehicles regularly travel between Batsi and Stavropeda (for Zagora work), Batsi and Chora (for work at Andros Archaeological Museum) plus all the other project needs of bringing people to and from the port of Gavrio, and all the purchase needs of the project – food for the team, all manner of office needs and equipment for the site.

However during a three-week stint on the project, almost all team members will make at least one visit to the capital of Andros, Chora, to visit the Archaeological Museum and the rest of this picturesque town, the Archaeological Museum of Paleopolis, the archaeological site of Ypsili and an excursion to the coastal town of Korthi.

On Sunday 19 October, team members visited Chora, and were given time to explore the exquisite Archaeological Museum of Andros which has finds of the 1960s and 70s Zagora excavations on display, as well as sculptures dating from the Archaic to the Roman period, a collection of inscriptions and sculptures of the Proto-byzantine and Byzantine periods.

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