The Mayor of Andros, Theodosis Sousoudis, visits Zagora

Mayor Theodosis Sousoudis and Dr Stavros Paspalas
In the centre of frame, from left: Mayor Theodosis Sousoudis and Dr Stavros Paspalas, a co-director of the Zagora Archaeological Project. © AAIA; photo by Irma Havlicek

On Saturday 1 November 2014, the Mayor of Andros, Mr Theodosis Sousoudis, visited Zagora. He met the three project directors, Professor Meg Miller, Associate Professor Lesley Beaumont and Dr Stavros Paspalas.

The Mayor and his group were then given a tour of the site by Stavros, who took them to each of the excavation areas, and explained what work was being done and what was being discovered in each area.

Through these photographs, you can share some moments of the tour, which was appreciated by the Mayor and his group.

The mayoral group began their tour near what had been the gate in the fortification wall during the Zagora settlement period
The mayoral group began their tour near what had been the gate in the fortification wall during the Zagora settlement period. © AAIA; photo by Irma Havlicek
The mayoral group making their way up a slope near the southern end of Zagora
The mayoral group making their way up a slope near the southern and of Zagora. © AAIA; photo by Irma Havlicek
Mayor Theodosis Sousoudis and Stavros Paspalas share a joke
In the centre, from left: Mayor Theodosis Sousoudis and Stavros Paspalas, Zagora Archaeological Project co-director, share a joke. © AAIA; photo by Irma Havlicek
Stavros Paspalas indicates a feature of the Zagora site to the mayoral tour
Stavros Paspalas, with his arm outstretched, indicates a feature of the site to the tour. © AAIA; photo by Irma Havlicek
The mayoral group is shown the important archaeological architectural conservation being undertaken by the Zagora Archaeological Project
Stavros shows the mayoral group the important archaeological architectural conservation being undertaken by the Zagora Archaeological Project under the direction of Dr Stefie Chlouveraki. Here, we see earth-based mortar which has been laid at a gentle slope away from the remaining temple walls so that water drains away from the temple walls. © AAIA; photo by Irma Havlicek
Preventative conservation work at area J
The mayoral tour was shown further preservation techniques being implemented at Zagora. The low stone wall you can see curving up from the foreground at left has been built by conservators contracted by the Zagora Archaeological Project. Then earth has been added, sloping away from the wall. This should prevent rain water running down the slope onto the previously excavated buildings, and should also prevent some plant seeds from being blown into the excavated buildings and taking root there. Plant root structures can damage the architecture. © AAIA; photo by Irma Havlicek
Mayor of Andros, Theodosis Sousoudis and Zagora Archaeological Project co-director, Professor Meg Miller at the entrance to the Zagora dig hut
Mayor of Andros, Theodosis Sousoudis and Zagora Archaeological Project co-director, Professor Meg Miller, at the entrance to the Zagora dig hut. © AAIA; photo by Irma Havlicek
Mayor Theodosis Sousoudis and Zagora Archaeological Project co-director, Professor Meg Miller, share a joke
Mayor of Andros, Theodosis Sousoudis and Zagora Archaeological Project co-director, Professor Meg Miller, share a joke. © AAIA; photo by Irma Havlicek

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